Project

WHO DIRTIED THE WATER? SCRIPT

As students enter the room, hand them a film canister that contains materials that will be added to the dirty water bell jar. The canisters will be labeled with only contents of the canister.

Beaver: wood chips
River: sand
Runoff: charcoal
Wetlands: dry grass
Shellfish: crushed shells
Hoodites: shells
Settlers: organic garbage
Carpenters: nails
Farmers: potting soil
Fisherman: nylon line
Houses: toilet paper
Sunbathers 1: colored paper
Sunbathers 2: newspaper
Sunbathers 3: plastic pieces
Boaters: Styrofoam
Laundromats: dish detergent
Merry Maids: baking soda
Ships: oil
Factories 1: molasses
Factories 2: vinegar

As the teacher or another student reads the story, each student with a canister will come forward, tell the class who or what they represent, describe what they think is in the canister, and add it to the water in the bell jar.

Students are to record on their data table who or what is doing the adding and the actual substance that has been added to the bell jar.

The Story:

Once upon a time there was a beautiful piece of land. It was almost an island, connected to the mainland by a narrow land bridge, and surrounded on three sides by a lake. The lake was filled with clear water and was dotted with a few small green islands. (Point to the jar). Fish and other aquatic life thrived in the water. The land was covered with trees and the land and the lake teemed with wildlife.

Chorus:

Would you want to swim in this lake?
Would you eat fish caught in this water?
Would you like to go boating in this lake?

Animal life flourished along a nearby river and the BEAVER were plentiful. A RIVER ran along one side of the land, carrying sediment with it as it flowed into the lake.

WETLANDS grew along the edges of the lake. Grasses from the wetlands sometimes washed into the lake and became food for the fish.

In the shallow water, clams and other SHELLFISH thrived.

A small group of people lived on this land, which they called Hoodland. The people were called the HOODITES. The Hoodite people fished for food and shellfish in the lake. They dumped some of their garbage near the lake. We still find the piles of the shells they left.

Chorus:

Would you want to swim in this lake?
Would you eat fish caught in this water?
Would you like to go boating in this lake?

After many years SETTLERS from Europe came to live in the area. The settlers built a town much larger than the Hoodite villages. Some of the town═s garbage was dumped into the lake. CARPENTERS built houses, farms, and stores that filled the Hoodland valley.

As the town grew, the settlers filled the wetlands to provide more land on which to build. FARMERS cut down trees to clear their fields. Without trees and wetlands to hold the soil, rain carried soil into the lake.

Chorus:

Would you want to swim in this lake?
Would you eat fish caught in this water?
Would you like to go boating in this lake?

More and more HOUSES and shops were built, and the town of Hoodville grew into a city. Sewer pipes were constructed to remove the waste from houses and bathrooms. The sewage flowed through the pipes into the bay.

Since the wetlands had been filled in, RUNOFF water washed pollution from the streets directly into the lake.

FISHERMAN found that nets made of plastic were stronger than those made of rope. Sometimes these nets got lost in the water.

Fisherman and other BOATERS sometimes threw their rubbish overboard.

Chorus:

Would you want to swim in this lake?
Would you eat fish caught in this water?
Would you like to go boating in this lake?

The city built LAUNDROMATS where people could wash their clothes. The detergents went down the pipes with the sewage into the lake.

People hired MERRY MAIDS to clean their houses. They used poisonous tile and drain cleaners, which flowed into the sewage system.

Even swimmers and SUN BATHERS going to enjoy the lake sometimes left garbage on its beaches.

As the city grew, SHIPS came to unload their supplies. Sometimes these ships spilled oil into the lake.

FACTORIES built along the water═s edge often dumped their toxic wastes and chemicals into the water.

Chorus:

Would you want to swim in his lake?
Would you eat fish caught in this water?
Would you like to go boating in this lake?

Reader completes the story asking:

  1. Who dirtied the water?
  2. Who is responsible for cleaning it up?
WHO DIRTIED THE WATER DATA TABLE
WHO IS ADDING WHAT IS ADDED
 
 
 
 
   
 

CLEAN WATER: IS IT DRINKABLE?

Purpose:

To simulate nature's water filtration system by devising a system that will filter out both visible and invisible pollutants from water.

Background:

Water is necessary to all living things. Earth is unique in our solar system having about 70 percent of its surface area covered with water. Of this water, only about three percent is potable (fit for human drinking). Of this three percent, almost two-thirds is tied up in glaciers and sea ice leaving approximately one percent of Earth's water available for use by living organisms including humans. This amount of available drinkable water is further reduced by the introduction of pollutants to our water cycle. Clean water is not a limitless resource.

Materials: